History of SCAM

The first SCAM workshop (SCAM 2001) was held in Florence, on November 10th 2001, co-located with ICSM 2001, WESS 2001and WSE 2001. 30 papers were submitted, of which 21 were accepted for publication. The workshop was a one day event with the emphasis on discussion. 40 people attended the workshop.

The SCAM 2001 Proceedings are published by the IEEE and there is a special issue of the journal Information and Software Technology featuring extended versions of selected papers from SCAM 2001.

The second SCAM workshop (SCAM 2002) was held in Montréal, on October 1st 2002 with ICSM 2002, WESS 2002, DBMR 2002, and WSE 2002. 23 papers were submitted, of which 17 were accepted for publication. The workshop maintained the discussion-based emphasis. Some resources and outputs from the workshop are available on the SCAM 2002 website. 43 people attended the workshop.

The SCAM 2002 Proceedings are published by the IEEE and there is a special issue of The Journal of Automated Software Engineering featuring extended versions of selected papers from the SCAM 2002 workshop.

The third SCAM workshop (SCAM 2003) was held in Amsterdam, on September 26th and 27th, co-located with ICSM 2003, STEP 2003, ELIZA 2003, VISSOFT 2003and WSE 2003. 43 papers were submitted, of which 21 were accepted for publication.

The workshop maintained the discussion-based emphasis, with short paper presentations of 15 minutes and long discussion slots. Due to the large number of paper submissions in 2003, the organisers moved from the one-day format of previous years, to a one-and-a-half day format. Some resources and outputs from the workshop are available on the SCAM 2003 website. 52 people attended the workshop.

The SCAM 2003 Proceedings are published by the IEEE and there will be a special issue of The Software Quality Journal featuring extended versions of selected papers from the SCAM 2003 workshop.

The fourth SCAM workshop (SCAM 2004) was held in Chicago, on the 15th and 16th of September 2004, co-located with ICSM 2004, Metrics 2004, WSE 2004and WESS 2004. 39 papers were submitted, of which 16 were accepted for publication.

The format was maintained, but extended to two full days to facilitate discussion and interaction. In particular, all attendees were encourage to write ideas on plastic slides, rather than merely contributing verbally. These slides were collected and scanned for the website. The slides, and other resources and outputs (including papers and talks presented at the workshop) are available on the SCAM 2004website. 43 people attended the workshop.

In addition to support from IEEE, the workshop was also sponsored by RainCode, The VASTT group and Loyola College, Maryland which greatly helped to reduce the registration fee.

The SCAM 2004 Proceedings are published by the IEEE and there will be a special issue of The Journal of Systems and Software featuring extended versions of selected papers from the SCAM 2004 workshop.


Mark Harman, Department of Computer Science, King's College London, Strand, London WC2R 2LS.