Welcome to SCAM 2024!

SCAM 2024 will be held in Flagstaff, Arizona, USA, co-located with ICSME 2024.

The aim of the International Conference on Source Code Analysis & Manipulation (SCAM) is to bring together researchers and practitioners working on theory, techniques and applications which concern analysis and/or manipulation of the source code of computer systems. While much attention in the wider software engineering community is properly directed towards other aspects of systems development and evolution, such as specification, design and requirements engineering, it is the source code that contains the only precise description of the behaviour of the system. The analysis and manipulation of source code thus remains a pressing concern.

Definition of ‘Source Code’

For the purpose of clarity ‘source code’ is taken to mean any fully executable description of a software system. It is therefore so-construed as to include machine code, very high level languages and executable graphical representations of systems. The term ‘analysis’ is taken to mean any automated or semi automated procedure which takes source code and yields insight into its meaning. The term ‘manipulation’ is taken to mean any automated or semi-automated procedure which takes and returns source code.

How to Submit to SCAM 2022

There are several tracks in the SCAM 2022 program. This page contains an overview for those tracks, and additional information required to submit. Each track has its own submission page and deadlines. Please consult the specific page of the track for all the relevant details.

The below table contains an overview of the tracks and links to their pages:

Track nameDeadlinesPage limitCall for paper
ResearchAbstract: June 17, 2022
Paper: June 23, 2022
12
EngineeringAbstract: July 1, 2022
Abstract + Paper: July 8, 2022
6
Replication and Negative Results (RENE)Abstract: July 1, 2022
Paper: July 8, 2022
12
New Ideas and Emerging Results (NIER)Abstract: July 1, 2022
Paper: July 8, 2022
5

Submission Guidelines

All submissions must be in English and should be submitted electronically in PDF format using EasyChair: https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=scam2023

Submitted papers should describe original, unpublished, and significant work and must not have been previously accepted for publication nor be concurrently submitted for review in another journal, book, conference, or workshop.

Papers must not exceed 12 pages (the last 2 pages can be used for references only) and must conform to the IEEE proceedings paper format guidelines. Templates in Latex and Word are available on IEEE's website. All submissions must be in English and should be submitted electronically in PDF format using EasyChair: https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=scam2023

All authors, reviewers, and organizers are expected to uphold the IEEE Code of Conduct. Failure to do so may lead to a (desk) rejection of the paper.

Double-blind Review

We follow a double-blind reviewing process, and every submission must adhere to the following rules:

  • Author names and affiliations must be omitted. (The track co-chairs will check compliance before reviewing begins
  • References to authors' own related work must be in the third person. (For example, not "We build on our previous work..." but rather "We build on the work of...")

If the program chairs find that authors did not respect the rules of double-blind review they can decide to (desk) reject the paper.

Artifact Evaluation

This year, likewise past year, ICSME, SCAM, and VISSOFT have joined forces and present a single Artifact Evaluation Track for all three venues. Authors of (short and long) papers accepted in the SCAM 2022 are invited to submit their artifacts for evaluation to the ICSME 2022 Joint Artifact Evaluation Track.

Proceedings

All accepted papers, presented at the conference, will appear in the proceedings which will be available through the IEEE Digital Library.

Special Issue

Extended versions of papers accepted at one of the SCAM 2022 tracks will be invited for submission in Journal of Software: Evolution and Process, Wiley.

Call for Research Track Papers

The 23rd IEEE International Conference on Source Code Analysis and Manipulation (SCAM 2023) aims to bring together researchers and practitioners working on theory, techniques, and applications that concern analysis and/or manipulation of the source code of software systems. The term “source code” refers to any fully executable description of a software system, such as machine code, (very) high-level languages, and executable graphical representations of systems. The term “analysis” refers to any (semi-)automated procedure that yields insight into source code, while “manipulation” refers to any automated or semi-automated procedure that takes and returns source code. While much attention in the wider software engineering community is directed towards other aspects of systems development and evolution, such as specification, design, and requirements engineering, it is the source code that contains the only precise description of the behavior of a system. Thus, the analysis and manipulation of source code remains a critical area of research from which SCAM 2023 solicits high-quality submissions.

Covered Topics and Paper Formats

We welcome submission of papers that describe original and significant work in the field of source code analysis and manipulation. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • abstract interpretation
  • bad smell detection
  • bug location and prediction
  • clone detection
  • concern, concept, and feature localization and mining
  • decompilation
  • energy efficient source code
  • natural language analysis of source code artifacts
  • program comprehension
  • program slicing
  • program transformation and refactoring
  • repository, revision, and change analysis
  • security vulnerability analysis
  • source level metrics
  • source level optimization
  • source-level testing and verification
  • static and dynamic analysis

SCAM explicitly solicits results from any theoretical or technological domain that can be applied to these and similar topics. Submitted papers should describe original, unpublished, and significant work and must not have been previously accepted for publication nor be concurrently submitted for review in another journal, book, conference, or workshop.

Papers must not exceed 12 pages (the last 2 pages can be used for references only) and must conform to the IEEE proceedings paper format guidelines. Templates in Latex and Word are available on IEEE's website. All submissions must be in English and should be submitted electronically in PDF format. Submission will be reviewed by at least three members of the program committee, judging the paper on its novelty, quality, importance, evaluation, and scientific rigor. If the paper is accepted, at least one author must register for the conference and present the paper. All authors, reviewers, and organizers are expected to uphold the IEEE Code of Conduct. Failure to do so may lead to a (desk) rejection of the paper.

Submission guidelines

All submissions must be in English and should be submitted electronically in PDF format using EasyChair: https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=scam2023

  • Papers must not exceed 12 pages, and the last 2 pages can be used for references only.
  • Papers must conform to the IEEE proceedings paper format guidelines. Templates in Latex and Word are available on IEEE's website.
  • All submissions must be in English and should be submitted electronically in PDF format.
  • Submissions will be reviewed by at least three members of the program committee, judging the paper on its novelty, presentation quality, importance, soundness, and the quality of its evaluation.
  • If the paper is accepted, at least one author must register for the conference and present the paper.
  • All authors, reviewers, and organizers are expected to uphold the IEEE Code of Conduct. Failure to do so may lead to a (desk) rejection of the paper.

Double-blind Review

We follow a double-blind reviewing process. Submitted papers must adhere to the following rules:

  • Author names and affiliations must be omitted. (The track co-chairs will check compliance before reviewing begins.)
  • References to authors' own related work must be in the third person. (For example, not "We build on our previous work..." but rather "We build on the work of...")

If the program chairs find that authors did not respect the rules of double-blind review they can decide to (desk) reject the paper.

Artifact Evaluation

ICSME, SCAM, and VISSOFT have joined forces and present a single Artifact Evaluation Track for all three venues. Authors of short and long papers, accepted to SCAM 2023, are invited to submit their artifacts for evaluation to the ICSME 2023 Joint Artifact Evaluation Track.

Proceedings

All accepted papers will appear in the proceedings which will be available through the IEEE Digital Library.

Important Dates for Research Track Papers

All submission dates are at 23:59 AoE (Anywhere on Earth, UTC-12).

Abstract Submission:Thursday, June 29th, 2023
Paper Submission:Thursday, July 6th, 2023
Author Notification:Thursday, August 10th, 2023
Camera Ready:Thursday, August 24th, 2023

Call for Engineering Track Papers

The Engineering Track in the 23rd IEEE International Conference on Source Code Analysis and Manipulation (SCAM 2023) looks for papers that discuss innovations and solutions to practical problems that researchers and practitioners face in source code analysis and manipulation of software systems. With the research advancements in source code analysis during the past decades, the industry has adopted many of the research ideas and built tools and techniques to solve real-world problems in daily jobs of software engineers. The Engineering Track provides an opportunity to discuss these important and often overlooked ideas and achievements so that software engineers and researchers can use them to improve their engineering development and produce high-quality software. This track aims at bringing researchers and software engineers to communicate and share their insights and collaborate on tools, libraries, and infrastructure for source code analysis.

This track welcomes six-page papers (included references) that report on the design and implementation of tools for source code analysis and manipulation, as well as libraries, infrastructure, and real-world studies. The papers are expected to discuss engineering work artifacts that have NOT been published before as the main contribution. We encourage submissions that accompany papers in the Research Track.

What artifacts qualify as Engineering Track material?

  • Tools: Software or hardware that facilitate source code analysis.
  • Libraries: Reusable APIs and frameworks.
  • Infrastructure: Projects that provide/facilitate access to data for reproducibility.
  • Data: Reusable datasets for other researchers to reproduce the results.
  • Real-world Studies: Studies that focus on how tools, libraries, infrastructure and data enable research.
  • Engineering challenges: Identifying engineering challenges that remain unresolved and have impact on research in source-code analysis.
Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:
  • Program transformation, refactoring, analysis, optimization and measurement.
  • Mining repositories, revisions and changes.
  • Bad smell detection, clone management, and program comprehension.
  • Concern, concept and feature localization and mining.
  • Source-level testing, verification, bug detection and prediction, security vulnerability analysis.
  • Natural language analysis of source code artifacts.

Submission guidelines

All submissions must be in English and should be submitted electronically in PDF format using EasyChair: https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=scam2023

The submission length has a limit of six pages, with the expectation that authors use the space to discuss artifact motivation, design, and use cases in detail. Papers must conform to the IEEE proceedings paper format guidelines. Templates in Latex and Word are available on IEEE's website. All submissions must be in English and should be submitted electronically in PDF format. Each submission will be reviewed by members of the Engineering Track program committee. Authors of accepted papers will be required to present their contributions at the conference.

The key criterion for acceptance is that the paper should (a) follow the above mentioned guidelines and (b) make an original contribution that can benefit practitioners in the field now and/or others designing and building artifacts for source code analysis and manipulation. The artifacts can range from an early research prototype to a polished deployed product. Papers about commercial products are welcome, as long as the guidelines described above are followed.

Videos and other demo material may be taken into account by reviewers as they review the paper, but the paper should be self contained. In order to preserve the anonymity of the reviewers, such material should be hosted on an anonymous public source, or made available in such a way that the track chairs can download them once and redistribute them to reviewers.

All authors, reviewers, and organizers are expected to uphold the IEEE Code of Conduct. Failure to do so may lead to a (desk) rejection of the paper.

Double-blind Review

This year, we are following a double-blind reviewing process. Submitted papers must adhere to the following rules:

  • Author names and affiliations must be omitted. (The track co-chairs will check compliance before reviewing begins.)
  • References to authors' own related work must be in the third person. (For example, instead of writing “We build on our previous work...” you should write “We build on the work of...”)

If the program chairs find that authors did not respect the rules of double-blind review they can decide to (desk) reject the paper.

Artifact evaluation

ICSME, SCAM, and VISSOFT have joined forces and present a single Artifact Evaluation Track for all three venues. Authors of short and long papers, accepted to SCAM 2023, are invited to submit their artifacts for evaluation to the ICSME 2023 Joint Artifact Evaluation Track.

Proceedings

All accepted papers will appear in the proceedings, which will be available through the IEEE Digital Library.

Important Dates

All submission dates are at 23:59 AoE (Anywhere on Earth, UTC-12).

Abstract Submission:Thursday, July 13th, 2023 Deadline extended!
Paper Submission:Thursday, July 13th, 2023
Author Notification:Thursday, August 17th, 2023
Camera Ready:Thursday, August 24th, 2023

Track co-chairs

  • Laura Moreno, CQSE, USA
  • Hitesh Sajnani, The TradeDesk, USA

Call for Replication and Negative Results Papers

The 23rd IEEE International Conference on Source Code Analysis and Manipulation (SCAM) will be hosting a Replication and Negative Results (RENE) track once again in 2023. Taking advantages of nowadays open science practices, this track provides a venue for researchers to submit papers reporting (1) replications of previous empirical studies (including controlled experiments, case studies, and surveys) and (2) important and relevant negative or null results (i.e., results that failed to show an effect, but help to eliminate useless hypotheses, therefore reorienting researchers on more promising research paths) related to source code analysis and manipulation (see list of topics in Technical Research Track).

Replications studies: Open science is key to fostering progress via transparency and empirical studies should be reproducible. However, papers in this category must go beyond simply re-implementing an algorithm and/or re-running the artifacts provided by the original paper. Such submissions should apply the approach on at least partially new data sets (open-source or proprietary). This also means that it is possible to use available infrastructures to conduct measurements and experiments but with different/extended datasets and different conditions, scenarios, etc. Replication studies can either strengthen the results of the original study by increasing external validity with additional data or provide new insights into the variables that may impact the results. A replication paper should clearly report on results that the authors were able to reproduce as well as on the aspects of the work that were irreproducible.

Negative results papers: Due to open source and open science initiatives, there are vast amounts of data and software artifacts available in repositories and online archival sites, such as GitHub and Zenodo. Not all analyses of such data and software artifacts result in expected positive results. In this category, we seek papers that report on negative results. We seek negative results for all types of software engineering research related to source code and manipulation (qualitative, quantitative, case study, experiment, etc.). Negative results are important contributions to scientific knowledge because they allow us to prune our hypothesis space. As Walter Tichy writes, "Negative results, if trustworthy, are extremely important for narrowing down the search space. They eliminate useless hypotheses and thus reorient and speed up the search for better approaches."

Evaluation Criteria

Both Reproducibility Studies and Negative Results submissions will be evaluated according to the following standards:

  • Depth and breadth of the empirical studies.
  • Clarity of writing.
  • Appropriateness of conclusions.
  • Amount of useful, actionable insights.
  • Deep discussion regarding the implications of the negative results or new results obtained with reproducibility studies.
  • Availability of artifacts.
  • Underlying methodological rigor and detailed description of procedures. For example, a negative result due primarily to misaligned expectations or due to lack of statistical power (small samples) is not a good submission. The negative result should be a result of a lack of effect, not lack of methodological rigor.
  • Clear descriptions of the differences between the original setup and the one used in the study (for the case of reproducibility studies).

Since we have decided to actively support open science, we expect that replication studies clearly point out the artifacts the study is built upon, and to provide the links to all the artifacts in the submission. However, we recognize that the success of the open science initiative depends on the willingness (and possibilities) of authors to disclose their data and artifacts. Note that all submissions will undergo the same review process independent of whether authors disclose their artifacts or data. For more information about our open science policy, please visit the ICSME 2023 call for papers.

Submission Guidelines

Papers must not exceed 12 pages (the last 2 pages can be used for references only) and must conform to the IEEE proceedings paper format guidelines. Templates in Latex and Word are available on IEEE's website. All submissions must be in English and should be submitted electronically in PDF format via EasyChair. Additionally, submissions must be original, in the sense that the findings and writing have not been previously published or under consideration elsewhere. The paper must be clearly marked as a RENE paper. Submissions will be reviewed by at least three members of the program committee. If the paper is accepted, at least one author must attend the conference and present the paper.

Double-blind review

We follow a double-blind reviewing process. Submitted papers must adhere to the following rules:

  • Author names and affiliations must be omitted. The track co-chairs will check compliance before reviewing begins.
  • References to authors' own related work must be in the third person. For example, not "We build on our previous work..." but rather "We build on the work of..."

If the program chairs find that authors did not respect the rules of double-blind review they can decide to (desk) reject the paper.

Artifact evaluation

ICSME, SCAM, and VISSOFT have joined forces and present a single Artifact Evaluation Track for all three venues. Authors of short and long papers, accepted to SCAM 2023, are invited to submit their artifacts for evaluation to the ICSME 2023 Joint Artifact Evaluation Track.

Proceedings

All accepted papers will appear in the proceedings, which will be available through the IEEE Xplore Digital Library.

Important Dates

All submission dates are at 23:59 AoE (Anywhere on Earth, UTC-12).

Abstract Submission:Thursday, June 13th, 2023 Deadline extended!
Paper Submission:Thursday, July 13th, 2023 Deadline extended!
Author Notification:Thursday, August 10th, 2023
Camera Ready:Thursday, August 24th, 2023

Track co-chairs

  • Quentin Stiévenart, Université du Québec à Montréal, Canada
  • Eduardo Figueiredo, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Brazil

Call for New Ideas and Emerging Results papers

Following the success of the previous editions of the New Ideas and Emerging Results (NIER) track at SCAM 2021 and SCAM 2022, the 23rd IEEE International Conference on Source Code Analysis and Manipulation (SCAM 2023) will again host a NIER track. This track aims to provide a place for researchers and practitioners to present, discuss, and polish early-stage research. This early-stage research should be innovative with the potential to make a strong future impact on the research or practice of software engineering. However, as it concerns early-stage research, the NIER track does not require submissions to have a strong evaluation. Instead, submissions should contain preliminary results that indicate the future potential of the research as well as a discussion of the challenges which must be overcome in the pursuit of the given research goals. These challenges should act as both future research directions as well as topics which the authors feel require discussion within the community. The topics of interest for this track are the same as for the main research track and are listed below.

Topics of Interest

We welcome the submission of papers that describe original and significant work in the field of source code analysis and manipulation. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • abstract interpretation
  • bad smell detection
  • bug location and prediction
  • clone detection
  • concern, concept, and feature localization and mining
  • decompilation
  • energy efficient source code
  • natural language analysis of source code artifacts
  • program comprehension
  • program slicing
  • program transformation and refactoring
  • repository, revision, and change analysis
  • security vulnerability analysis
  • source level metrics
  • source level optimization
  • source-level testing and verification
  • static and dynamic analysis

We explicitly solicit results from any theoretical or technological domain that can be applied to these and similar topics.

Submission guidelines

All submissions must be in English and should be submitted electronically in PDF format using EasyChair: https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=scam2023

Submitted papers should describe original, unpublished, and significant work. These papers must not have been previously accepted for publication, nor be concurrently submitted for review in another journal, book, conference, or workshop.

The submissions must follow the rules of the double-blind reviewing process. Additionally:

  • papers must not exceed 6 pages, including figures, tables, appendices, and references (the 6th page can be used for references only)
  • papers must be marked as a NIER track papers
  • papers must conform to the IEEE proceedings paper format guidelines; templates in LaTeX and Word are available on IEEE’s website
  • all submissions must be in English and should be submitted electronically in PDF format
  • if the paper is accepted, at least one author must register for the conference and present the paper
  • all authors, reviewers, and organizers are expected to uphold the IEEE Code of Conduct; failure to do so may lead to a (desk) rejection of the paper
Double-blind review

We follow a double-blind reviewing process. Submitted papers must adhere to the following rules:

  • author names and affiliations must be omitted (the track co-chairs will check compliance before reviewing begins)
  • eferences to authors' own related work must be in the third person (for example, instead of writing “We build on our previous work...” you should write “We build on the work of...”)

If the program chairs find that authors did not respect the rules of double-blind review they can decide to (desk) reject the paper.

Paper evaluation

Submissions will be evaluated based on their originality, the importance of their contribution, the challenges highlighted, and their potential future significance. In addition, reviewers are asked to consider the soundness, overall quality, clarity and consistency of presentation, and whether the submission appropriately contextualizes itself with respect to related work. Again, the NIER track does not require a complete evaluation. Preliminary data and a discussion of the challenges and future research directions supported by this preliminary data are encouraged.

Artifact Evaluation

ICSME, SCAM, and VISSOFT have joined forces and present a single Artifact Evaluation Track for all three venues. Authors of short and long papers, accepted to SCAM 2023, are invited to submit their artifacts for evaluation to the ICSME 2023 Joint Artifact Evaluation Track.

Proceedings

All accepted papers will appear in the SCAM 2023 proceedings, which will be available through the IEEE Digital Library.

Important Dates

All submission dates are at 23:59 AoE (Anywhere on Earth, UTC-12).

Abstract Submission:Thursday, July 13th, 2023 Deadline extended!
Paper Submission:Thursday, July 13th, 2023
Author Notification:Thursday, August 17th, 2023
Camera Ready:Thursday, August 24th, 2023

Track co-chairs

  • Michele Pasqua, University of Verona (Italy)
  • Preetha Chatterjee, Drexel University (USA)

Artifact Evaluation

T.B.A.

Steering Committee

Charter

The International Conference on Source Code Analysis & Manipulation (SCAM) is governed by the steering committee following a community ratified steering committee charter (v1.2, adopted in 2012).

Organizing Committee

General Chair
Web Chair
Proceeding Chair

Program Committees

This page contains all of the Program Committee members for the various tracks of SCAM.

Research Track

Name Affiliation
Eman AlomarSIT
Francesca Arcelli FontanaUniversity of Milano – Bicocca
Lingfeng BaoZhejiang University
Alexandre BergelUniversity of Chile
Arianna BlasiMeta
Eunjong ChoiKyoto Institute of Technology
Joanna Cecilia da Silva SantosUniversity of Notre Dame
Coen De RooverVrije Universiteit Brussel
Dario Di NucciUniversity of Salerno
Kecia FerreiraFederal Center for Technological Education of Minas Gerais
Cuiyun GaoThe Chinese University of Hong Kong
Alessandra GorlaIMDEA
Sebastian HeroldKarlstad University, Department of Computer Science
Siyuan JiangEastern Michigan University
Maria KechagiaUniversity College London
Timo KehrerUniversity of Bern
Maxime LamothePolytechnique Montreal
Xupeng LiColumbia University
Facundo MolinaIMDEA Software Institute
Csaba NagyUniversità della Svizzera italiana
Christian NewmanRochester Institute of Technology
Ali OuniETS Montreal, University of Quebec
Mike PapadakisUniversity of Luxembourg
Anthony PerumaUniversity of Hawai‘i at Mānoa
Fabio PetrilloÉcole de technologie supérieure (ÉTS)
Aurora RamírezUniversity of Córdoba
Banani RoyUniversity of Saskatchewan
Hitesh SajnaniMicrosoft
Kevin SchneiderUniversity of Saskatchewan
Tushar SharmaDalhousie University
Allison SullivanThe University of Texas at Arlington
Yiming TangConcordia University
Zhe YuRochester Institute of Technology
Xueling ZhangRochester Institute of Technology
Mel Ó CinnéideNational University of Ireland, Dublin
Michael Decker *Bowling Green State University
Naser Al Madi *Colby College
* Emergency review volunteer

Engineering Track

Name Affiliation
Akinori IharaWakayama University
Ali OuniETS Montreal - University of Quebec
Daniel Izquierdo-CortazarBitergia
Gábor AntalUniversity of Szeged
Hironori WashizakiWaseda University
Jacek CzerwonkaMicrosoft
James DavisPurdue University
Jochen QuanteRobert Bosch GmbH
Johan FabryRaincode Labs
Judit JászSZTE University
Karsten SohrCenter for Computing Technologies - Universität Bremen
Preethu RoseTCS
Ravindra NaikTCS Research - TRDDC - Pune
Shivali AgarwalIBM - India Research Lab
Wolfram Fenskepure-systems GmbH
Zoltan PorkolabEotvos Lorond University

RENE Track

Name Affiliation
Alexander SerebrenikEindhoven University of Technology
Andrea StoccoTechnical University of Munich
Eduardo FernandesUniversity of Southern Denmark
Eduardo FigueiredoFederal University of Minas Gerais
Fabiano FerrariFederal University of Sao Carlos
Fiorella ZampettiUniversity of Sannio
Gias UddinUniversity of Calgary
Gilles PerrouinUniversity of Namur
Jeongju SohnUniversity of Luxembourg
Leandro AntonelliUniversidad Nacional de La Plata
Lingfeng BaoZhejiang University
Mariano CeccatoUniversity of Verona
Maurizio LeottaUniversity of Genova
Naser JivanBrock University
Quentin StiévenartUniversité du Québec à Montréal
Vassilis ZafeirisAthens University of Economics and Business
Wesley AssunçãoNorth Carolina State University
Xiao ChenMonash University
Zoltán PorkolábEötvös Loránd University

NIER Track

Name Affiliation
Matteo Biagiola
Preetha ChatterjeeDrexel University
Jesus M. Gonzalez-Barahona
Péter Hegedűs
Andrea JanesFHV Vorarlberg University of Applied Sciences
Foutse Khomh
Stefano Lambiase
Alberto LovatoUniversità degli studi di Verona
Christian MachoUniversity of Klagenfurt
Csaba NagyUniversità della Svizzera italiana
Ana-Maria Oprescu
Luca PascarellaETH Zurich
Michele PasquaUniversity of Verona
Fabiano Pecorelli
Valeria PontilloUniversity of Salerno
Masud RahmanDalhousie University
Vincenzo RiccioUniversity of Udine
Mohammed SayaghQueen's University
Giulia SellittoUniversity of Salerno
Andrea StoccoTechnische Universität München
Gias Uddin
László VidácsUniversity of Szeged, Hungarian Academy of Sciences

Registration

For SCAM 2023 registration, kindly visit the Registration page on the ICSME site through this link.

Accomodation

You can find details about accommodation on the ICSME site as well, accessible through this link.

Accepted Papers for the Research Track

  • Title: BoostNSift: A Query Boosting and Code Sifting Technique for Method Level Bug Localization by: Abdul Razzaq, Jim Buckley, James Patten, Muslim Chochlov and Ashish Rajendra Sai
  • Title: How does Migrating to Kotlin Impact the Run-time Efficiency of Android Apps? by: Michael Peters, Gian Luca Scoccia and Ivano Malavolta
  • Title: Jicer: Simplifying Cooperative Android App Analysis Tasks by: Felix Pauck and Heike Wehrheim
  • Title: D-REX: Static Detection of Relevant Runtime Exceptions with Location Aware Transformer by: Farima Farmahinifarahani, Yadong Lu, Vaibhav Saini, Pierre Baldi and Cristina Lopes
  • Title: A Precise Framework for Source-Level Control-Flow Analysis by: Idriss Riouak, Christoph Reichenbach, Görel Hedin, and Niklas Fors
  • Title: Formal Definition and Automatic Generation of Semantic Metrics: An Empirical Study on Bug Prediction by: Ting Hu, Ran Mo, Pu Xiong, Zengyang Li and Qiong Feng
  • Title: Fex: Assisted Extraction of Domain Features from C Programs by: Patrick Müller, Krishna Narasimhan and Mira Mezini
  • Title: Improving Readability of Scratch Programs with Search-based Refactoring by: Felix Adler, Gordon Fraser, Eva Gründinger, Nina Körber, Simon Labrenz, Jonas Lerchenberger, Stephan Lukasczyk and Sebastian Schweikl
  • Title: Empirical Comparison of Black-box Test Case Generation Tools for RESTful APIs by: Davide Corradini, Amedeo Zampieri, Michele Pasqua and Mariano Ceccato
  • Title: Measuring source code conciseness across programming languages using compression by: Lodewijk Bergmans, Xander Schrijen, Edwin Ouwehand and Magiel Bruntink
  • Title: Leveraging Unsupervised Learning to Summarize APIs Discussed in Stack Overflow by: Amirhossein Naghshzan, Latifa Guerrouj and Olga Baysal
  • Title: Method Calls Frequency-Based Tie-Breaking Strategy For Software Fault Localization by: Qusay Idrees Sarhan, Béla Vancsics and Árpád Beszédes
  • Title: What do Developers Discuss about Code Comments? by: Pooja Rani, Mathias Birrer, Sebastiano Panichella, Mohammad Ghafari and Oscar Nierstrasz
  • Title: Towards Understanding Developers’ Machine-Learning Challenges: A Multi-Language Study on Stack Overflow by: Alaleh Hamidi, Giuliano Antoniol, Foutse Khomh, Massimiliano Di Penta and Mohammad Hamidi

Accepted Papers

Research track

  • Applying the Universal Version History Concept to Help De-Risk Copy-Based Code Reuse by David Reid and Audris Mockus
  • Automating test-specific refactoring mining: a mixed-method investigation by Luana Martins, Heitor Costa, Marcio Ribeiro, Fabio Palomba and Ivan Machado
  • Behind Developer Contributions on Conflicting Merge Scenarios by Gustavo Vale, Eduardo Fernandes, Eduardo Figueiredo and Sven Apel
  • Calibrating Deep Learning-based Code Smell Detection using Human Feedback by Himesh Nandani, Mootez Saad and Tushar Sharma
  • Change Pattern Detection for Optimising Incremental Static Analysis by Cindy Wauters, Jens Van der Plas, Quentin Stiévenart and Coen De Roover
  • CIGAR: Contrastive Learning for GitHub Action Recommendation by Jiangnan Huang and Bin Lin
  • Do Code Quality and Style Issues Differ Across (Non-)Machine Learning Notebooks? Yes! by Md Saeed Siddik and Cor-Paul Bezemer
  • Evolutionary Feature Dependencies: Analyzing Feature Co-Changes in C Systems by Sandro Schulze, Phillipp Engelke and Jacob Krüger
  • Explaining Transformer-based Code Models: What Do They Learn? When They Do Not Work? by Ahmad Haji Mohammadkhani, Hadi Hemmati and Chakkrit Tantithamthavorn
  • Generating Understandable Unit Tests through End-to-End Test Scenario Carving by Amirhossein Deljouyi and Andy Zaidman
  • How They Relate and Leave: Understanding Atoms of Confusion in Open-Source Java Projects by Oton Pinheiro, Lincoln Rocha and Windson Viana
  • How Well Can Masked Language Models Spot Identifiers That Violate Naming Guidelines? by Viola Campos, Johannes Villmow, Jean Petry, Amine Abbad-Andaloussi, Adrian Ulges and Barbara Weber
  • Leveraging User-Defined Identifiers for Counterfactual Data Generation in Source Code Vulnerability Detection by Hongyu Kuang, Feng Yang, Long Zhang, Gaigai Tang and Lin Yang
  • PASD: A Performance Analysis Approach Through the Statistical Debugging of Kernel Events by Mohammed Adib Khan, Morteza Noferesti and Naser Ezzati-Jivan
  • PTLVD:Program Slicing and Transformer-based Line-level Vulnerability Detection System by Tao Peng, Shixu Chen, Fei Zhu, Junwei Tang, Junping Liu and Xinrong Hu
  • Quality Assurance Awareness in Open Source Software Projects on GitHub by Ali Khatami and Andy Zaidman
  • Symbolic Execution to Detect Semantic Merge Conflicts by Ward Muylaert, Johannes Härtel and Coen De Roover
  • The Docker Hub Image Inheritance Network: Construction and Empirical Insights by Ruben Opdebeeck, Jonas Lesy, Ahmed Zerouali and Coen De Roover
  • Unboxing Default Argument Breaking Changes in Scikit Learn by Joao Eduardo Montandon, Luciana L. Silva, Cristiano Politowski, Ghizlane El Boussaidi and Marco Tulio Valente
  • Using the TypeScript compiler to fix erroneous Node.js snippets by Brittany Reid, Christoph Treude and Markus Wagner
  • When to Let the Developer Guide: Trade-offs Between Open and Guided Test Amplification by Carolin Brandt, Danyao Wang and Andy Zaidman

Engineering track

  • ACER: An AST-based Callgraph Generator Framework by Andrew Chen, Yanfu Yan and Denys Poshyvanyk
  • Enabling Go Program Analysis in Rascal by Luke Swearngan and Mark Hills
  • On Developing and Improving Tools for Architecture-Smell Tracking in Java Systems by Philipp Gnoyke, Sandro Schulze and Jacob Krüger
  • Reproducing and Improving the BugsInPy Dataset by Faustino Aguilar, Samuel Grayson and Darko Marinov

New Ideas and Emerging Results track

IDEs as the Bridge: Connecting Humans and Code
  • Can We Trust the Default Vulnerabilities Severity? by Matteo Esposito, Sergio Moreschini, Valentina Lenarduzzi, David Hästbacka and Davide Falessi
  • On the Impact of Language Selection for Training and Evaluating Programming Language Models by Jonathan Katzy, Maliheh Izadi and Arie van Deursen
  • Uncovering the Hidden Risks: The Importance of Predicting Bugginess in Untouched Methods by Matteo Esposito and Davide Falessi

Keynotes

We are proud to announce the following keynotes:

Title: IDEs as the Bridge: Connecting Humans and Code

Abstract: In the ever-evolving world of software development, human factors play a pivotal role in shaping how individuals engage in programming activities and, subsequently, how Integrated Development Environments (IDEs) should cater to human needs. This talk delves into the intricate interplay between human expertise, gender, and the programming process, highlighting their profound impact on tasks such as code creation, foraging (finding information), reuse, and debugging. We will discuss: (1) the influence of gender and expertise-aware approaches on code development and their implications for software engineering practices, emphasizing the significance of diversity and inclusion in technology; and (2) Human-AI interaction with conversational agents, their effects on programmers and coding workflows, and ways to enhance collaboration and productivity. Our focus will center on IDEs as the critical interface between humans and code.

Sandeep Kaur Kuttal is an Associate Professor at The North Carolina State University, where she directs the Human-Centric Software Engineering Lab. Her research combines Human-Computer Interaction, Software Engineering, and Artificial Intelligence. She focuses on the human aspects of software engineering by studying and modeling programmer behavior and then designing and developing mixed-initiative programmer-computer systems. Sandeep is a recent recipient of the NSF CAREER and AFOSR YIP awards. She has received a best paper award at ACM CHI, best paper at ACM/IEEE ICGSE, and an honorable mention at ACM CHI. She is on the editorial board of the Journal of Computer Languages, vice-chair of the steering committee for the IEEE Symposium on Visual Languages and Human-Centric Computing (VL/HCC) and acted as chair or program committee member at CHI, VL/HCC, HCII, ICSE, FSE, ASE, ICST, ICSME, CHASE, ICPC, and IUI. She is passionate about diversity and inclusion.



Title: Reducing Hallucinations: Harnessing Contextual Analysis for AI Code Generation

Abstract: The evolution of generative AI holds tremendous promise for automating and enhancing various facets of software engineering. However, as with any nascent technology, it comes with its own set of challenges. A notable one is that generative AI can occasionally 'hallucinate', producing code that, while syntactically correct, may be contextually off-mark or even erroneous. These instances underscore the urgent need for refined methodologies and deeper insights. In this keynote, Prof. Mesbah delves into the confluence of program analysis and generative AI, charting a course toward more precise and context-aware code generation. He posits that instead of arbitrarily choosing context for a developer task, the context should encapsulate meaningful and pertinent details relevant to the task. By showcasing key findings from his recent research, he will highlight how a software's contextual grasp can be pivotal in enhancing the accuracy of AI-driven code generation.
Journey with us into a session that reveals how the fusion of program analysis with generative AI is setting the stage for a future where technology seamlessly augments human creativity and precision in coding activities.

Ali Mesbah is a Professor at the University of British Columbia (UBC). He dedicates his research to addressing critical challenges in software engineering, specifically in the areas of automated software analysis and testing, software evolution, and fault localization and repair. His recent work involves the integration of program analysis with generative AI to devise advanced code generation techniques. Throughout his career, Prof. Mesbah has been honoured with several awards, including the Amazon Research Award, Killam Accelerator Research Fellowship, Killam Research Prize, Canadian Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) Discovery Accelerator, a Most Influential Paper Award (SCAM 2023), and multiple ACM/IEEE Distinguished Paper Awards. He is a member of the steering committee for the UBC Research Excellence Cluster on Trustworthy ML, has served as an Associate Editor for the IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering, and regularly serves on program committees of flagship conferences in software engineering such as ICSE.

Most Influential Paper award

SCAM 2021 is happy to announce that the most influencial paper award goes to "Lightweight Transformation and Fact Extraction with the srcML Toolkit" by Michael Collard, Michael Decker, and Jonathan Maletic originally published in SCAM 2011. The srcML toolkit is a widely-used fact extraction and source-code transformation toolkit, which continues to have a large impact on the software engineering research community because it is easy to use and continues to be maintained and updated. The first paper on the tool was published at SCAM 2011 and since then it has fostered a wide range of research innovations throughout software engineering and been awarded the Mining Software Repositories 2020 Foundational Contribution Award. Many SCAMers have used the tool in their own research, making this paper well deserving of the MIP award.

The Most Influential Paper Co-chairs are Arpad Beszedes and Dawn Lawrie.

Program

Sunday, October 1st, 2023

5.45 PM - 7.45 PM

Joint reception SCAM, IWSC and VISSOFT at Villa Paulina (University campus)

8.00 PM

Buses take people back to the conference hotels

Monday, October 2nd, 2023

Location: room RGD 004, RGD building, also known as “Centro Civico” (University campus)

Start time: 9.00 AM

9.00 AM - 10.30 AM

Session 1

Chair: Leon Moonen

9.00 AM - 9.30 AM

Opening

Opening and keynote introduction

9.30 AM - 10.30 AM

SCAM + VISSOFT keynote

IDEs as the Bridge: Connecting Humans and Code

Sandeep Kaur Kuttal

10.30 AM - 11.00 AM

Coffee break 1

11.00 AM - 12.30 PM

Session 2: Software Evolution and Maintenance

Chair: Eduardo Figueiredo

11.00 AM - 12.10 PM

Main track

~ 10 minutes

How They Relate and Leave: Understanding Atoms of Confusion in Open-Source Java Projects

Oton Pinheiro, Lincoln Rocha, and Windson Viana

Main track

~ 10 minutes

Change Pattern Detection for Optimising Incremental Static Analysis

Cindy Wauters, Jens Van der Plas, Quentin Stiévenart, and Coen De Roover

Main track

~ 10 minutes

Evolutionary Feature Dependencies: Analyzing Feature Co-Changes in C Systems

Sandro Schulze, Phillipp Engelke, and Jacob Krüger

NIER Track

~ 7 minutes

On the Impact of Language Selection for Training and Evaluating Programming Language Models

Jonathan Katzy, Maliheh Izadi, and Arie van Deursen

Main track

~ 10 minutes

Unboxing Default Argument Breaking Changes in Scikit Learn

Joao Eduardo Montandon, Luciana Lourdes Silva, Cristiano Politowski, Ghizlane El Boussaidi, and Marco Tulio Valente

Main track

~ 10 minutes

Automating test-specific refactoring mining: a mixed-method investigation

Luana Martins, Heitor Costa, Marcio Ribeiro, Fabio Palomba, and Ivan Machado

12.10 PM - 12.30 PM

Discussion

12.30 PM - 2.00 PM

Lunch break

2.00 PM - 3.30 PM

Session 3: Vulnerability and Security Analysis

Chair: Quentin Stiévenart

2.00 PM - 3.10 PM

Main track

~ 10 minutes

Applying the Universal Version History Concept to Help De-Risk Copy-Based Code Reuse

David Reid and Audris Mockus

Main track

~ 10 minutes

The Docker Hub Image Inheritance Network: Construction and Empirical Insights

Ruben Opdebeeck, Jonas Lesy, Ahmed Zerouali and Coen De Roover

Main track

~ 10 minutes

PTLVD: Program Slicing and Transformer-based Line-level Vulnerability Detection System

Tao Peng, Shixu Chen, Fei Zhu, Junwei Tang, Junping Liu and Xinrong Hu

NIER Track

~ 7 minutes

Can We Trust the Default Vulnerabilities Severity?
Matteo Esposito, Sergio Moreschini, Valentina Lenarduzzi, David Hästbacka and Davide Falessi

Main track

~ 10 minutes

Leveraging User-Defined Identifiers for Counterfactual Data Generation in Source Code Vulnerability Detection

Hongyu Kuang, Feng Yang, Long Zhang, Gaigai Tang, and Lin Yang

Main track

~ 10 minutes

CIGAR: Contrastive Learning for GitHub Action Recommendation

Jiangnan Huang and Bin Lin

3.10 PM - 3.30 PM

Discussion

3.30 PM - 4.00 PM

Coffee break 2

4.00 PM - 5.30 PM

Session 4

Chair: Mike Godfrey

4.00 PM - 4.30 PM

MIP

Most influential paper award SCAM 2013

4.30 PM - 5.30 PM

Open steering committee meeting

5.45 PM - 9.00 PM

SCAM banquet

At restaurant Maria Tomasa, 5 min walk from campus, follow student volunteers

9.15 PM

Buses take people back from the banquet to the conference hotels

Tuesday, October 3rd, 2023

Location: room RGD 004, RGD building, also known as “Centro Civico” (University campus)

Start time: 9.00 AM

9.00 AM - 10.30 AM

Session 5

Chair: Alessandra Gorla

9.00 AM - 9.30 AM

Notifications

Notifications and keynote introduction

9.30 AM - 10.30 AM

SCAM keynote

Reducing Hallucinations: Harnessing Contextual Analysis for AI Code Generation

Ali Mesbah

10.30 AM - 11.00 AM

Coffee break 1

11.00 AM - 12.30 PM

Session 6: Software Quality and Technical Debt

Chair: Laura Moreno

11.00 AM - 12.10 PM

Main track

~ 10 minutes

Quality Assurance Awareness in Open Source Software Projects on GitHub

Ali Khatami and Andy Zaidman

Main track

~ 10 minutes

How Well Can Masked Language Models Spot Identifiers That Violate Naming Guidelines?

Viola Campos, Johannes Villmow, Jean Petry, Amine Abbad-Andaloussi, Adrian Ulges, and Barbara Weber

Engineering Track

~ 7 minutes

On Developing and Improving Tools for Architecture-Smell Tracking in Java Systems

Philipp Gnoyke, Sandro Schulze, and Jacob Krüger

Main track

~ 10 minutes

Calibrating Deep Learning-based Code Smell Detection using Human Feedback

Himesh Nandani, Mootez Saad and Tushar Sharma

Main track

~ 10 minutes

Do Code Quality and Style Issues Differ Across (Non-)Machine Learning Notebooks? Yes!

Md Saeed Siddik and Cor-Paul Bezemer

Main track

~ 10 minutes

Behind Developer Contributions on Conflicting Merge Scenarios

Gustavo Vale, Eduardo Fernandes, Eduardo Figueiredo, and Sven Apel

Discussion

12.30 PM - 2.00 PM

Lunch break

2.00 PM - 3.30 PM

Session 7: Software Testing and Debugging

Chair: Coen de Roover

Main track

~ 10 minutes

When to Let the Developer Guide: Trade-offs Between Open and Guided Test Amplification

Carolin Brandt, Danyao Wang, and Andy Zaidman

Main track

~ 10 minutes

Generating Understandable Unit Tests through End-to-End Test Scenario Carving

Amirhossein Deljouyi and Andy Zaidman

Main track

~ 10 minutes

Using the TypeScript compiler to fix erroneous Node.js snippets

Brittany Reid, Christoph Treude, and Markus Wagner

NIER Track

~ 7 minutes

Uncovering the Hidden Risks: The Importance of Predicting Bugginess in Untouched Methods

Matteo Esposito and Davide Falessi

Main track

~ 10 minutes

Explaining Transformer-based Code Models: What Do They Learn? When They Do Not Work?

Ahmad Haji Mohammadkhani, Hadi Hemmati and Chakkrit Tantithamthavorn

Main track

~ 10 minutes

PASD: A Performance Analysis Approach Through the Statistical Debugging of Kernel Events

Mohammed Adib Khan, Morteza Noferesti and Naser Ezzati-Jivan

3.10 PM - 3.30 PM

Discussion

3.30 PM - 4.00 PM

Coffee break 2

4.00 PM - 5.30 PM

Session 8: Software Analysis

Chair: Hitesh Sajnani

4.00 PM - 4.45 PM

Main track

~ 10 minutes

Symbolic Execution to Detect Semantic Merge Conflicts
Ward Muylaert, Johannes Härtel and Coen De Roover

Engineering Track

~ 7 minutes

ACER: An AST-based Call Graph Generator Framework
Andrew Chen, Yanfu Yan and Denys Poshyvanyk

Engineering Track

~ 7 minutes

Reproducing and Improving the BugsInPy Dataset

Faustino Aguilar, Samuel Grayson and Darko Marinov

Engineering Track

~ 7 minutes

Enabling Go Program Analysis in Rascal

Luke Swearngan and Mark Hills

4.45 PM - 5.00 PM

Discussion

5.00 PM - 5.30 PM

Closing

Closing and introduction of SCAM 2024

5.30 PM

Student volunteers walk SCAM participants to the reception

5.45 PM - 7.45 PM

Joint reception SCAM, VISSOFT, ICSME on the terrace of Edificio C on campus

Fun

SCAM has always maintained the tradition of giving participants a special SCAM mug. You can see the mugs of some of the past editions in the slideshow below.

Skit

Scene:    A long line in an official-looking hall, leading to a desk.    At the desk is a SECRETARY; a MAN and his WIFE are at the front of the line.    Somewhere in the line is a group of VIKINGS.

 

MAN:    ’Morning!

 

SECRETARY:    ’Morning..    What conference package would you like to sign up for?

 

MAN:    Well, what’ve you got?

 

SECRETARY:    Well, there’s ICSE and SCAM; ICSME and SCAM; GECCO, WSE, SCAM, and ISSTA; SCAM, WSE, PLDI, SCAM, and SCAM; SCAM, ICPC, SCAM, SCAM, SANER, SCAM, ICST, and SCAM…

 

VIKINGS:    (starting to chant) SCAM SCAM SCAM SCAM…

 

SECRETARY:    SCAM, SCAM, SCAM, SCAM, ICSE, SCAM, SCAM, and SCAM…

 

VIKINGS:    (singing) Lovely SCAM!    Lovely SCAM!

 

SECRETARY:    ...or partying in the colorful Limassol carnival, take a picture of the Aphrodite’s Rock, Zenobia wreck diving, followed by a tasting of Haloumi cheese paired with Commandaria wine, and SCAM.

 

WIFE:    Have you got anything without SCAM?

 

SECRETARY:    (flipping papers) Well, there’s SCAM, ICSE, GECCO, and SCAM; that’s not got much SCAM in it….

 

WIFE:    I don’t want any SCAM!

 

MAN:    Why can’t she go to ISSTA, CSM, ICSM, ICSME, and SCAM?

 

WIFE:    That’s got SCAM in it!

 

MAN:    Hasn’t got as much SCAM as SCAM, ICSE, GECCO, and SCAM, has it?

 

VIKINGS:    SCAM SCAM SCAM SCAM, SCAM SCAM SCAM SCAM…

 

WIFE:    Could you put us down for ISSTA, ICSE, and SCAM without the SCAM then?

 

SECRETARY:    (shudders) Ugggh…

 

WIFE:    What do you mean “ugggh”?    I don’t want to go to SCAM!

 

VIKINGS:    Lovely SCAM!    Wonderful SCAM!

SECRETARY:    (to VIKINGS) Shaddup!

 

VIKINGS:    Lovely SCAM!    Wonderful SCAM!

 

SECRETARY:    Shaddup!    (aside) Bloody Vikings…You can’t go to ISSTA, ICSE, and SCAM without the SCAM!

 

WIFE:    (shriek) I don’t want to go to SCAM!

 

MAN:    Ssssh, dear, don’t cause a fuss.    I’ll attend your SCAM.    I love it!    I’m signing up for SCAM, SCAM, SCAM, SCAM, SCAM, SCAM, GECCO, SCAM, SCAM, and SCAM!

 

VIKINGS:    (singing) SCAM SCAM SCAM SCAM, SCAM SCAM SCAM SCAM!    Lovely SCAM!    Wonderful SCAM!

 

SECRETARY:    (to VIKINGS) Shut up! (to MAN) GECCO’s full up.

 

MAN:    Well, could I go to her SCAM instead of GECCO then?

 

SECRETARY:    You mean you’re going to SCAM SCAM SCAM SCAM…

 

VIKINGS:    (join in with the SECRETARY and start singing)

SCAM SCAM SCAM SCAM.

Lovely SCAM! Wonderful SCAM!

Lovely SCAM! Wonderful SCAM –

SCA-A-A-A-AM SCA-A-A-A-AM SCA-A-A-A-AM SCA-A-A-A-AM –

Lovely SCAM! (Lovely SCAM!)

Lovely SCAM! (Lovely SCAM!)

Lovely SCAM!

SCAM, SCAM, SCAM,

SCAAAAAAAAM!



Supporters

For SCAM 2022 we are proud to have the support of two leading companies in Software Engineering, GrammaTech and Facebook. We would like to thank both GrammaTech and Facebook for their support, as they make it possible to host SCAM!

About GrammaTech

GrammaTech is a small company that was originally founded in Ithaca New York in 1988 as a spin-off of Cornell University. We do both contract research and develop commercial products. Our team of researchers comprises 20 PhD-qualified scientists who conduct research projects that are mostly funded by various US government agencies. These are primarily oriented towards cybersecurity, and touch on software analysis, transformation, monitoring and autonomic functions. Our most successful commercial product to date is CodeSonar, an advanced static analysis tool for finding serious software defects that is sold mostly to customers in embedded safety-critical industries. A new product named CodeSentry is a SaaS product to find N-day security vulnerabilities in software binaries. GrammaTech welcomes inquiries from those interested in joining our team; see the following page.

About Facebook

At Facebook, our mission of giving people the power to build community and bring the world closer together requires constant innovation. That’s where research comes in.

We believe the most interesting research questions are derived from real-world problems. Our expert teams of scientists and engineers work quickly and collaboratively to build smarter, more meaningful experiences on a global scale by solving the most challenging technology problems, as well as look toward the future.

SCAM Author Scholarships

Thanks to generous support from Grammatech and Facebook, SCAM is pleased to offer scholarships for authors who are (a) undergraduate and graduate students, (b) participants from low- or lower-middle income countries, (c) first-time participants, and (d) members of groups traditionally underrepresented in the SCAM community.

  • The list of low- and lower-middle income countries is available here.
  • Such groups as women, blacks, an LGBTIQ+ have traditionally been underrepresented in computing in general, and in the SCAM community, in particular. This list is not and cannot be exhaustive.

Applications for the author scholarships are closed, and the notifications have been sent.

SCAM Participation Scholarships

Thanks to generous support from Grammatech and Facebook, SCAM is pleased to offer scholarships for participants who are (a) undergraduate and graduate students, (b) participants from low- or lower-middle income countries, (c) first-time participants, and (d) members of groups traditionally underrepresented in the SCAM community.

  • The list of low- and lower-middle income countries is available here.
  • Such groups as women, blacks, an LGBTIQ+ have traditionally been underrepresented in computing in general, and in the SCAM community, in particular. This list is not and cannot be exhaustive.

Please apply for the scholarship on EasyChair. Deadline is September 20th and notifications will be sent by September 22nd.