Welcome to SCAM'21!

SCAM 2021 will be held virtually, co-located with ICSME 2021.

The aim of the International Working Conference on Source Code Analysis & Manipulation (SCAM) is to bring together researchers and practitioners working on theory, techniques and applications which concern analysis and/or manipulation of the source code of computer systems. While much attention in the wider software engineering community is properly directed towards other aspects of systems development and evolution, such as specification, design and requirements engineering, it is the source code that contains the only precise description of the behaviour of the system. The analysis and manipulation of source code thus remains a pressing concern.

Definition of ‘Source Code’

For the purpose of clarity ‘source code’ is taken to mean any fully executable description of a software system. It is therefore so-construed as to include machine code, very high level languages and executable graphical representations of systems. The term ‘analysis’ is taken to mean any automated or semi automated procedure which takes source code and yields insight into its meaning. The term ‘manipulation’ is taken to mean any automated or semi-automated procedure which takes and returns source code.

How to Submit to SCAM 2021

There are several different tracks in the SCAM 2021 program, this page contains an overview for those tracks, and additional information required to submit. Each track has its own submission page and deadlines, please consult the specific page of the track for all of the relevant details.

The below table contains an overview of the tracks, links to their pages, and papers accepted previously at the tracks:

Track name Description Sample submission Contact
Research

The research track welcomes practitioners and researchers who work on theory, techniques, and applications that concern analysis and/or manipulation of the source code of software systems.

Sample. Venera Arnaoudova, Ben Hermann
Engineering The engineering track looks for papers that discuss the innovations and solutions to practical problems that researchers and practitioners face in source code analysis and manipulation of software systems. Best paper 2020. Behnaz Hassanshahi, Vadim Zaytsev
Replication and Negative Results (RENE) The RENE track provides a venue for researchers to submit papers reporting (1) replications of previous empirical studies (including controlled experiments, case studies, and surveys) and (2) important and relevant negative or null results (i.e., results that failed to show an effect, but help to eliminate useless hypotheses. Bonita Sharif, Heike Wehrheim
New Ideas and Emerging Results (NIER) The NIER track provides a place for researchers and practitioners to present, discuss, and polish early-stage research. This early-stage research should be innovative and have the potential to make a strong future impact on the research or practice of software engineering. Sample. Maleknaz Nayebi, Yannic Noller

The sample submissions were selected from the distinghuished papers of SCAM 2020 by the PC chairs.

Submission Guidelines

Papers must conform to the IEEE proceedings paper format guidelines. Templates in Latex and Word are available on IEEE's website. All submissions must be in English. All authors, reviewers, and organizers are expected to uphold the IEEE Code of Conduct. Failure to do so may lead to a (desk) rejection of the paper.

Papers can be submitted using EasyChair.

Double Anonymous Review

We follow a double-anonymous reviewing process. Submitted papers must adhere to the following rules:

  • Author names and affiliations must be omitted. (The track co-chairs will check compliance before reviewing begins.)
  • References to authors' own related work must be in the third person. (For example, not "We build on our previous work..." but rather "We build on the work of...")

Please see the Double-Anonymous Reviewing FAQ for more information and guidance. If the program chairs find that authors did not respect the rules of double-anonymous review they can decide to (desk) reject the paper.

Open Science Policy

SCAM encourages open science practices. Sharing data sets, replication packages, or preprints are not required, but we provide guidance for those wishing to do so.

If you decide to share data or scripts, we encourage you to use an online archival site such as zenodo.org, figshare.com, or archive.org. These sites ensure the content is archived and generate a DOI for the content, enabling it to be cited. To learn more about how to share data while maintaining double-anonymous, read the explanation provided by Daniel Graziotin available here https://ineed.coffee/5205/how-to-disclose-data-for-double-blind-review-and-make-it-archived-open-data-upon-acceptance/.

We also encourage you to submit such artifacts to the joint artifact evaluation track of ICSME, SCAM, and VISSOFT (see below).

We recognise that anonymising artifacts such as source code is more difficult than preserving anonymity in a paper. We ask authors to take a best effort approach to not reveal their identities. We will also ask reviewers to avoid trying to identify authors by looking at commit histories and other such information that is not easily anonymised. Authors wanting to share GitHub repositories may want to look into using https://anonymous.4open.science/ which is an open source tool that helps you to quickly Double-anonymous your repository.

SCAM supports and encourages Green Open Access also called self-archiving. We encourage authors to self-archive a preprint of your accepted manuscript in an e-print server such as arXiv.org. Open access increases the availability of your work and increases citation impact (https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0013636). To learn more about open access, please read the Green Open Access FAQ (https://avandeursen.com/2016/11/06/green-open-access-faq/) by Arie van Deursen. Note that if your research includes scraped GitHub data, the GitHub Terms of Service require that “publications resulting from that research are open access” (https://help.github.com/articles/github-terms-of-service/). If possible, we recommend that you archive your paper (e.g., on arXiv or on your website) only after the SCAM reviewing process is completed, to avoid undermining the double-anonymous reviewing process in place.

The combined AE track will introduce the artifact evaluation for the first time to SCAM! Authors of (short and long) papers accepted in the ICSME, SCAM, or VISSOFT 2021 are invited to submit their artifacts for evaluation to the ICSME 2021 Joint Artifact Evaluation Track here.

Proceedings

All accepted papers will appear in the proceedings which will be available through the IEEE Digital Library.

Special Issue

Extended versions of papers accepted at one of the SCAM 2021 tracks will be invited for submission in one of the software engineering research journals.

Abstract deadline extension:

The abstract submission deadline for the research track has been extended until June 24th AOE.

The paper submission deadline for the research track has been extended until June 30th AOE.

Call for Research Track Papers

The 21th IEEE International Working Conference on Source Code Analysis and Manipulation (SCAM 2021) aims to bring together researchers and practitioners working on theory, techniques, and applications that concern analysis and/or manipulation of the source code of software systems. The term "source code" refers to any fully executable description of a software system, such as machine code, (very) high-level languages, and executable graphical representations of systems. The term "analysis" refers to any (semi-)automated procedure that yields insight into source code, while "manipulation" refers to any automated or semi-automated procedure that takes and returns source code. While much attention in the wider software engineering community is directed towards other aspects of systems development and evolution, such as specification, design, and requirements engineering, it is the source code that contains the only precise description of the behavior of a system. Hence, the analysis and manipulation of source code remains a pressing concern for which SCAM 2021 solicits high quality paper submissions.

Covered Topics and Paper Formats

We welcome submission of papers that describe original and significant work in the field of source code analysis and manipulation. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • abstract interpretation
  • bad smell detection
  • bug location and prediction
  • clone detection
  • concern, concept, and feature localization and mining
  • decompilation
  • energy efficient source code
  • natural language analysis of source code artifacts
  • program comprehension
  • program slicing
  • program transformation and refactoring
  • repository, revision, and change analysis
  • security vulnerability analysis
  • source level metrics
  • source level optimization
  • source-level testing and verification
  • static and dynamic analysis

SCAM explicitly solicits results from any theoretical or technological domain that can be applied to these and similar topics. Submitted papers should describe original, unpublished, and significant work and must not have been previously accepted for publication nor be concurrently submitted for review in another journal, book, conference, or workshop.

Before submitting please follow the guidelines in How to Submit. Additionally, papers must not exceed 12 pages (the last 2 pages can be used for references only) and the papers should be submitted electronically in PDF format via EasyChair. Submission will be reviewed by at least three members of the program committee, judging the paper on its novelty, quality, importance, evaluation, and scientific rigor. If the paper is accepted, at least one author must register for the conference and present the paper.

Important Dates for Research Papers

All submission dates are at 23:59 AoE (Anywhere on Earth, UTC-12).

Abstract Submission: June 24th, 2021
Conflict Declaration: June 21st - June 28th, 2021
Paper Submission: June 30th, 2021
Paper Bidding: June 25th - June 28th, 2021
Reviews due Date: July 26th, 2021
Paper Discussion: July 27th - August 1st, 2021
Author Notification: August 2nd, 2021
Camera Ready: August 9th, 2021

 

Call for Engineering Track Papers

The Engineering Track in the 21st IEEE International Working Conference on Source Code Analysis and Manipulation (SCAM) looks for papers that discuss innovations and solutions to practical problems that researchers and practitioners face in source code analysis and manipulation of software systems. With the research advancements in source code analysis during the past decades, the industry has adopted many of the research ideas and built tools and techniques to solve real-world problems in daily jobs of software engineers. The Engineering Track provides an opportunity to discuss these important and often overlooked ideas and achievements so that software engineers and researchers can use them to improve their engineering development and produce high-quality software. This track aims at bringing researchers and software engineers to communicate and share their insights and collaborate on tools, libraries, and infrastructure for source code analysis.

This track welcomes six-page papers that report on the design and implementation of tools for source code analysis and manipulation, as well as libraries, infrastructure, and real-world studies. The papers are expected to discuss engineering work artifacts that have NOT been published before as the main contribution. We encourage submissions that accompany papers in the Research Track.

What artifacts qualify as Engineering Track material?

  • Tools: Software or hardware that facilitate source code analysis.
  • Libraries: Reusable APIs and frameworks.
  • Infrastructure: Projects that provide/facilitate access to data for reproducibility.
  • Data: Reusable datasets for other researchers to reproduce the results.
  • Real-world Studies: Studies that focus on how tools, libraries, infrastructure and data enable research.
  • Engineering challenges: Identifying engineering challenges that remain unresolved and have impact on research in source-code analysis.
Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:
  • Program transformation, refactoring, analysis, optimisation and measurement.
  • Mining repositories, revisions and changes.
  • Bad smell detection, clone management, and program comprehension.
  • Concern, concept and feature localization and mining.
  • Source-level testing, verification, bug detection and prediction, security vulnerability analysis.
  • Natural language analysis of source code artifacts.

The submission length has a limit of 6 pages, with the expectation that authors use the space to discuss artifact motivation, design, and use cases in detail.

Each submission will be reviewed by members of the Engineering Track program committee. Authors of accepted papers will be required to present their contributions at the conference. All accepted Engineering Track papers will be published in the conference proceedings. The key criterion for acceptance is that the paper should (a) follow the above mentioned guidelines and (b) make an original contribution that can benefit practitioners in the field now and/or others designing and building artifacts for source code analysis and manipulation. The artifacts can range from an early research prototype to a polished deployed product. Papers about commercial products are welcome, as long as the guidelines described above are followed.

Videos and other demo material may be taken into account by reviewers as they review the paper, but the paper should be self contained. In order to preserve the anonymity of the reviewers, such material should be hosted on an anonymous public source, or made available in such a way that the track chairs can download them once and redistribute them to reviewers.

Proceedings

All accepted papers will appear in the proceedings which will be available through the IEEE Digital Library. Follow the general SCAM instructions on How to Submit. Additionally, this year ICSME, SCAM, and VISSOFT have joined forces and present a single Artifact Evaluation Track for all three venues. Authors of (short and long) papers accepted in the ICSME, SCAM, or VISSOFT 2021 Tracks are invited to submit their artifacts for evaluation to the ICSME 2021 Joint Artifact Evaluation Track.

Important dates

All submission dates are at 23:59 AoE (Anywhere on Earth, UTC-12).

Abstract Submission: July 26th, 2021
Paper Submission: August 2nd, 2021
Reviews due Date: August 16th, 2021
Paper Discussion: August 16th - August 20th, 2021
Author Notification: August 20th, 2021
Camera Ready: August 27th, 2021

Call for Replication and Negative Results Papers

The 21st IEEE International Working Conference on Source Code Analysis and Manipulation (SCAM) will be hosting a Replication and Negative Result (RENE) track once again in 2021. This track provides a venue for researchers to submit papers reporting (1) replications of previous empirical studies (including controlled experiments, case studies, and surveys) and (2) important and relevant negative or null results (i.e., results that failed to show an effect, but help to eliminate useless hypotheses, therefore reorienting researchers on more promising research paths) related to source code analysis and manipulation (see list of topics in Technical Research Track).

Replications studies: The papers in this category must go beyond simply re-implementing an algorithm and/or re-running the artifacts provided by the original paper. Such submissions should apply the approach on at least a partially new data sets (open-source or proprietary). This also means that it is possible to use available infrastructures to conduct measurements and experiments but with different/extended datasets and different conditions, scenarios, etc. Replication studies can either strengthen the results of the original study by increasing external validity with additional data or provide new insights into the variables that may impact the results. A replication paper should clearly report on results that the authors were able to reproduce as well as on the aspects of the work that were irreproducible.

Negative results papers: In this category we seek papers that report on negative results. We seek negative results for all types of software engineering research related to source code and manipulation (qualitative, quantitative, case study, experiment, etc.). Negative results are important contributions to scientific knowledge because they allow us to prune our hypothesis space. As Walter Tichy writes, "Negative results, if trustworthy, are extremely important for narrowing down the search space. They eliminate useless hypotheses and thus reorient and speed up the search for better approaches."

Evaluation Criteria

Both Reproducibility Studies and Negative Results submissions will be evaluated according to the following standards:

  • Depth and breadth of the empirical studies.
  • Clarity of writing.
  • Appropriateness of conclusions.
  • Amount of useful, actionable insights.
  • Deep discussion regarding the implications of the negative results or new results obtained with reproducibility studies.
  • Availability of artifacts.
  • Underlying methodological rigor and detailed description of procedures. For example, a negative result due primarily to misaligned expectations or due to lack of statistical power (small samples) is not a good submission. The negative result should be a result of a lack of effect, not lack of methodological rigor.
  • Clear descriptions of the differences between the original setup and the one used in the study (for the case of reproducibility studies).

Most importantly, we expect that replication studies clearly point out the artifacts the study is built upon, and to provide the links to all the artifacts in the submission (the only exception will be given to those papers that reproduce the results on proprietary datasets that can not be publicly released).The paper should describe any changes to the original study design made during the replication, along with a justification for each change. The papers should contain a discussion section that compares the findings of the original and replication studies and describe the new knowledge gained from the replication along with any lessons learned from performing the replication. Partial replications are also welcome as long as the paper clearly states which parts of the study were replicated and which parts are new.

Submission Guidelines

Before submitting please follow the guidelines in How to Submit. Additionally, submissions must be original, in the sense that the findings and writing have not been previously published or under consideration elsewhere. Papers must not exceed 10 pages for the main text, inclusive of figures, tables, appendices; references only may be included on up to 2 additional pages. The paper must be clearly marked as a RENE paper. The papers should be submitted electronically in PDF format via EasyChair. Submission will be reviewed by at least three members of the program committee, judging the paper on its novelty, quality, importance, evaluation, and scientific rigor. If the paper is accepted, at least one author must attend the conference and present the paper.

Important Dates

All submission dates are at 23:59 AoE (Anywhere on Earth, UTC-12).

Abstract Submission: July 26th, 2021
Paper Submission: August 2nd, 2021
Author Notification: August 20th, 2021
Camera Ready: August 27th, 2021

Abstract deadline extension:

The abstract submission deadline for the research track has been extended until August 2nd, 2021 AOE.

Call for New Ideas and Emerging Results papers

After the successful first time having a New Ideas and Emerging Results (NIER) track at last year’s conference, the 21th IEEE International Working Conference on Source Code Analysis and Manipulation (SCAM) will again host a NIER track. The goal of this track is to provide a place for researchers and practitioners to present, discuss, and polish early-stage research. This early-stage research should be innovative and have the potential to make a strong future impact on the research or practice of software engineering. However, as it concerns early-stage research, the NIER track does not require submissions to have a strong evaluation. Instead, submissions should contain preliminary results that indicate the future potential of the research as well as a discussion of the challenges which must be overcome in the pursuit of the given research goals. These challenges should act as both future research directions as well as topics which the authors feel require discussion within the community. The topics of interest for this track are the same as for the main research track and are listed below.

Topics of Interest

We welcome the submission of papers that describe original and significant work in the field of source code analysis and manipulation. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • abstract interpretation
  • bad smell detection
  • bug location and prediction
  • clone detection
  • concern, concept, and feature localization and mining
  • decompilation
  • energy efficient source code
  • natural language analysis of source code artifacts
  • program comprehension
  • program slicing
  • program transformation and refactoring
  • repository, revision, and change analysis
  • security vulnerability analysis
  • source level metrics
  • source level optimization
  • source-level testing and verification
  • static and dynamic analysis

REFLECTIONS

In addition to the mainstream submissions, as a new addition this year, we welcome Reflection papers which focuses on the mid-aged studies published in a partnered journal (TSE, IST, EMSE, JSS, TOSEM) in 3 to 8 years ago with the intent to discuss the current impact and implications. The purpose of this initiative is fostering innovation and transition of research results by systematically allowing authors to explore and evaluate the status quo of their research after a few years since its original publication.

Papers published between 2013 to 2019 in one of the partnered journals which related to one or more of the topics in this call for papers are eligible to submission.

Submission Instructions

Before submitting please follow the guidelines in How to Submit. Additionally, submissions must be original, in the sense that the findings and writing have not been previously published or under consideration elsewhere. Papers must not exceed 5 pages for the main text, which includes figures, tables, appendices, and references. The paper must be clearly marked as a NIER paper. The papers should be submitted electronically in PDF format via EasyChair. Submissions will be reviewed by at least three members of the program committee, judging the paper on its novelty, quality, importance, evaluation, and scientific rigor. If the paper is accepted, at least one author must attend the conference and present the paper.

Evaluations

Submissions will be evaluated on the basis of their originality, the importance of their contribution, the challenges highlighted, and their potential future significance. In addition, reviewers are asked to consider the soundness, overall quality, clarity and consistency of presentation, and whether the submission appropriately contextualizes itself with respect to related work. Again, the NIER track does not require a full evaluation to be present within the submission. Preliminary data, as well as a discussion of the challenges and future research directions supported by this preliminary data, is encouraged.

Important Dates

All submission dates are at 23:59 AoE (Anywhere on Earth, UTC-12).

Abstract Submission: August 2nd, 2021
Paper Submission: August 2nd, 2021
Author Notification: August 20th, 2021
Camera Ready: August 27th, 2021

Artifact Evaluation

This year ICSME, SCAM, and VISSOFT have joined forces and present a single Artifact Evaluation Track for all three venues. The combined AE track will introduce the artifact evaluation for the first time to SCAM! Authors of (short and long) papers accepted in the ICSME, SCAM, or VISSOFT 2021 are invited to submit their artifacts for evaluation to the ICSME 2021 Joint Artifact Evaluation Track here.

Artifact Evaluation Important Dates
Artifact Submission: August 27th, 2021
Author Notification: September 17th, 2021

Steering Committee

Charter

The International Working Conference on Source Code Analysis & Manipulation (SCAM) is governed by the steering committee following a community ratified steering committee charter (v1.2, adopted in 2012).

Organizing Committee

General Chair
Research Track Program Co-Chairs
Engineering Track Program Co-Chairs
RENE Track PC Co-chairs
New Ideas and Emerging Results (NIER) co-chairs
Most Influential Paper Co-chairs
Publicity Chair
Finance Chair
Proceeding chair
Scholarships Co-Chairs
Social Media Co-Chairs
Virtualization Co-chairs
Web Chair
  • Nathan Cassee, Eindhoven Unversity of Technology, The Netherlands

Program Committees

This page contains all of the Program Committee members for the various tracks of SCAM.

Research Track

Name Affiliation
Ben Hermann Technical University Dortmund (co-chair)
Venera Arnaoudova Washington State University (co-chair)
Bram Adams MCIS, Queen's University
Saba Alimadadi Simon Fraser University
Paul Anderson GrammaTech, Inc.
Yoshitaka Arahori Tokyo Institute of Technology
Francesca Arcelli Fontana University of Milano - Bicocca
John Businge University of Antwerp
Fernando Castor Federal University of Pernambuco & Utrecht University
Bharti Chimdyalwar Tata Consultancy Services Ltd.
Eunjong Choi Kyoto Institute of Technology
Diego Elias Damasceno Costa Concordia University
Dario Di Nucci Tilburg University / JADS
Jens Dietrich Massey University
Zhen Dong National University of Singapore
Sigrid Eldh Ericsson AB
Ralf Huuck UNSW Sydney / LOGILICA
Marie-Christine Jakobs TU Darmstadt
Alexander Jordan Oracle Labs
Ritu Kapur Ph.D. IIT Ropar
Raffi Khatchadourian City University of New York (CUNY) Hunter College
Thierry Lavoie Synopsys
Bin Lin Università della Svizzera italiana
Mario Linares-Vásquez Universidad de los Andes
Magnus Madsen Aarhus University
Onaiza Maqbool Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad
Tukaram Muske TCS Research
Willian Oizumi PUC-Rio
Ali Ouni ETS Montreal, University of Quebec
Fabio Palomba University of Salerno
Jens Palsberg University of California, Los Angeles
Hila Peleg University of California, San Diego
Rahul Purandare Indraprastha Institute of Information Technology Delhi
Gordana Rakic Faculty of Science, Novi Sad
Sreedevi Sampath University of Maryland, Baltimore County
Quentin Stievenart VUB
Yulei Sui University of Technology, Sydney
Ewan Tempero The University of Auckland
Ayse Tosun Istanbul Technical University
Andreea Vescan Babes-Bolyai University
Willem Visser AWS and Stellenbosch University
Haowei Wu Google
Jinqiu Yang Concordia University

Engineering Track

Name Affiliation
Behnaz Hassanshahi Oracle Labs (co-chair)
Vadim Zaytsev University of Twente (co-chair)
Emad Aghajani Software Institute, USI Università della Svizzera italiana, Switzerland
Johan Fabry Raincode Labs
Boryana Goncharenko independent consultant
Foutse Khomh École Polytechnique de Montréal
Ana-Maria Oprescu University of Amsterdam
Fabio Petrillo Universite du Quebec a Chicoutimi
Tushar Sharma Siemens Corporate Technology
Joanna Cecilia da Silva Santos Rochester Institute of Technology
Stepan Sindelar Oracle Labs
Johannes Späth Universität Paderborn
Cristian-Alexandru Staicu CISPA Helmholtz Center for Information Security

RENE Track

Name Affiliation
Bonita Sharif University of Nebraska Lincoln, USA (co-chair)
Heike Wehrheim University of Oldenburg, Germany (co-chair)
Lingfeng Bao Zhejiang University, China
Xiao Chen Monash University, Australia
Eleni Constantinou Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands
Mark Hills East Carolina University, US
Abu Naser Masud Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden
Eric J. Rapos Miami University, US
Jeffrey Svajlenko Microsoft, US
Gias Uddin University of Calgary, Canada

NIER Track

Name Affiliation
Maleknaz Nayebi York University (co-chair)
Yannic Noller National University of Singapore (co-chair)
Bram Adams MCIS
Michael J. Decker Bowling Green State University
Sinem Getir Yaman Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin
Jesus Gonzalez-Barahona Universidad Rey Juan Carlos
Matthieu Jimenez SnT
Rody Kersten Synopsys
Marouane Kessentini University of Michigan
Foutse Khomh Ecole Polyetchnic of Montreal
Kasper Luckow Amazon Web Services
Kaushik Madala University of North Texas
Luca Pascarella Università della Svizzera Italiana (USI)
Quoc-Sang Phan Facebook
Gema Rodriguez Perez University of Waterloo
Vaibhav Sharma Amazon Web Services
Damian Andrew Tamburri Technical University of Eindhoven - Jeronimus Academy of Data Science
Abhishek Tiwari National University of Singapore
Saeid Tizpaz-Niari University of Texas at El Paso
Kim Völlinger Technische Universität Berlin
Kirsten Winter The University of Queensland
Zhe Yu North Carolina State University

Fun & Gift Competition

SCAM has always maintained the tradition of giving participants a special SCAM mug. You can see the mugs of some of the past editions in the slideshow below. This year, SCAM will be virtual and sending mugs around the world is unfortunately not practical.

As we do not want to let 2021 go past unnoticed, and let our participants stay without a gift, we have decided to launch a competition for the best "2D" gift (For instance, a sticker, or a beer mat). The "Gift track" of the submission website is open, and will remain open until May 23, 23:59.

We are looking for high-quality vector graphics (SVG, PDF, EPS, etc.) or high-resolution bitmaps. The Organization committe will select the winning design from all of the submissions. If your design is selected as the winning design you will receive eternal fame, and a free registration! You should only submit original work to which you own the rights, and you should be willing to allow SCAM to use your design.

You can submit your designs using easychair here.

Supporters

For SCAM 2021 we are proud to have the support of two leading companies in Software Engineering, GrammaTech and Facebook. We would like to thank both GrammaTech and Facebook for their support, as they make it possible to host SCAM!

About GrammaTech

GrammaTech is a small company that was originally founded in Ithaca New York in 1988 as a spin-off of Cornell University. We do both contract research and develop commercial products. Our team of researchers comprises 20 PhD-qualified scientists who conduct research projects that are mostly funded by various US government agencies. These are primarily oriented towards cybersecurity, and touch on software analysis, transformation, monitoring and autonomic functions. Our most successful commercial product to date is CodeSonar, an advanced static analysis tool for finding serious software defects that is sold mostly to customers in embedded safety-critical industries. A new product named CodeSentry is a SaaS product to find N-day security vulnerabilities in software binaries. GrammaTech welcomes inquiries from those interested in joining our team; see the following page.

About Facebook

At Facebook, our mission of giving people the power to build community and bring the world closer together requires constant innovation. That’s where research comes in.

We believe the most interesting research questions are derived from real-world problems. Our expert teams of scientists and engineers work quickly and collaboratively to build smarter, more meaningful experiences on a global scale by solving the most challenging technology problems, as well as look toward the future.

SCAM Author Scholarships

Thanks to generous support from Grammatech and Facebook, SCAM is pleased to offer scholarships for authors who are (a) undergraduate and graduate students, (b) participants from low- or lower-middle income countries, (c) first-time participants, and (d) members of groups traditionally underrepresented in the SCAM community.

Please apply for the scholarship on EasyChair. Additional scholarships for participants will be available late summer.